Barking dogs

Barking dogs are one of the most complained about issues facing Councils. It is also one of the most difficult issues for Council to deal with because:

  • We all have a different view as to what is a nuisance noise. This will vary from the location of the dog to the complainant, noise tolerance level of complainant, type of barking and time/length of barking. 
  • Gathering evidence and completing barking diaries can be time consuming and difficult. 
  • Council Rangers often need to consult with other neighbours to ascertain whether indeed the barking is causing a nuisance. 
  • The owners often are not aware that their dog is barking excessively.

What to do if you are troubled by a barking dog

  1. Discuss: We all have a different view as to what is a noise nuisance. This will vary from the location of the dog to the complainant, noise tolerance level of complainant, type of barking and time/length of barking. 
  2. Wait: It is important that you give your neighbours a reasonable time to address the problem.
  3. Contact Council: You can lodge a complaint with council and the rangers will attend and advise the owner of the dogs of the complaint and ask that they take steps to stop the dogs from barking.
  4. Lodge complaint to Council: If the situation is not resolved after a reasonable time period you may lodge a formal complaint with Council. Along with your complaint Council will require a copy of the completed Barking Dog Diary that has been completed for at least fourteen (14) days.
  5. Contact a Community Justice Centre (CJC) or take private civil action: CJC is a free government service that specialises in settling differences between neighbours through mediation. The process has a high success rate. Access the CJC website.
If you are still not satisfied with the outcome you can take your own civil action through your local court.
 
Further information on barking dogs:
 

What to do if your dog barks

If you are worried that your dog is barking too much:

  • Make sure you give it plenty of attention when you are at home
  • Exercise your dog
  • Make sure your dog has plenty of food, water and shelter
  • Leave toys out for your dog to play with when you are not there
  • Discipline your dog

Anti-Barking Collars can be purchased from the following suppliers

Bark Control Australia
p: 1300 668 931 
f: (07) 3337 9844
e: sales@barkcontrol.com.au
w:  www.barkcontrol.com.au

Animal Care Equipment and Services
1-3 Chapel Road
Moorabin  VIC  3189
p: (03) 9532 6069 or (03) 9532 5651
f: (03) 9555 7829
e:  aces@animalcare.com.au

General Tips of Good Dog Management

  1. Desex your dog at an early age. 
  2. Register your dog with your local Council as soon as it becomes eligible.
  3. Never console a frightened, aggressive or barking dog. Reprimand for undesirable behaviour and only praise for good behaviour.
  4. Do not allow your dog to bark at things that are not a threat to your security, such as passing pedestrians, the postman, neighbours, stray dogs, birds etc. A visual barrier can assist in this way in some circumstances.
  5. Be a responsible dog owner and remember a good watchdog makes for a happy neighbourhood.
  6. Seek professional help if your dog is too difficult for you to handle, and if so, don't feel like you have failed. Humans are naturally human trainers and it takes special skills to be able to train dogs successfully.
  7. Always walk your dog on a leash and pick up any droppings.
  8. Wherever possible confine your dog at night to reduce any annoyance to your neighbours.

If you have tried all of the techniques and are still having problems, maybe you should talk to your local vet or contact a registered dog trainer for advice

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